Suburban Timewaster

I play video games and review them.

Journey

A hooded figure takes a long journey.  Along the way, he or she will meet others like him or her and discover what happened to the place where he or she is traveling.

That’s exactly what the game is about, some unknown character travelling.  You don’t know why they’re doing it, what they hope to accomplish, or even if the character’s a girl or a boy.  All you know for sure is that when you reach the end of the level, some being shows you artwork of a lost civilization.  The people here only seem to communicate through music notes and body language, and the only thing close to voice work is the sad song that plays through some parts of the game.  The whole plot is left to your interpretation.  Is the traveler a lost alien from another planet researching the remains of the one he or she is left on?  Is the traveler a result of an evolved race of humans who have reached the point where speech is no longer a necessity?  The reincarnation of a member of the race he or she is studying in order to advance to a higher plane of existence?  What happened to the civilization that the traveler’s researching?  Did they kill each other fighting for resources and destroy the planet along with themselves?  There are so many different interpretations that it’s up to your brain to decide which one’s the true one.

The game play itself is very unique.  Like I said, the only way people seem to communicate in this world is through music notes and body language.  During each level, you meet one person who is playing the game.  Is it the same person or is it a different person throughout each level?  There’s no name to identify who you’re traveling with and you can’t even type messages to communicate to the other person.  It’s not until you reach the credits you even find out who you were travelling with in the first place.  The character might as well have been controlled by the computer.  You don’t even have to cooperate with the person if you don’t want to.  If they’re more interested in exploring the ruins than in getting to the end of the level, you can just leave them there.  If the situation’s reversed, you can just let the person go ahead of you.  The characters also have a long ribbon attached to their robes that allows them to take flight.  How long you can fly depends on the length of the ribbon and how much power is in it.  You can gather more by using you ability to make notes to collect energy from flying ribbons (yes, I am aware of how stupid that sounds), or your companion can use that ability to grant you power.  You can also do the same for your companion.

The plot itself is open to interpretation, but the music and artwork really help set the mood.  Not to mention that the way player interaction is handled, it actually feels like you’re traveling with a stranger.  I give this game 8 out of 10, the perfect game for an aspiring writer.

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6 thoughts on “Journey

  1. Very nice! I’m glad to see you played it as well and enjoyed it.

  2. Glad you had a chance to play this one! So far, I’ve watched six different people play it in addition to my own two runthroughs, and it just doesn’t get old. Everybody seems to react differently, though they tend to agree that it’s an awesome game to experience. 😀

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